We have a rigorous safety assessment that we recommend for organisations to screen potential employees who are in safety critical roles. This report covers 5 potential personality characteristics which can impact on whether a person will act safety at work. The scales are:

Impulsive - Conscientious

This scale measures how conscientious and disciplined a person is.  Low scorers tend to be impulsive and easily distracted which can be a safety issue.  High scorers tend to be determined, reliable and are not easily distracted.

Risk Taking - Rule Abiding

This scale measures a person’s willingness to take risks and how conforming they are.  Low scorers tend to be rebellious, challenging and they may lack integrity.  High scorers tend to be conventional, rule following and dependable.

Volatile - Stable

This scale measures emotional stability and how well an individual handles stressful situations.  Low scorers tend to be less resilient and they may regularly experience negative emotions and moods.  High scorers tend to be calm, even-tempered, cheerful, and relaxed, as well as being able to handle stressful situations without becoming anxious or upset.

Defiant - Agreeable

This scale measures agreeableness and how helpful and open someone is to others.  Low scorers tend to be defensive, intolerant, and sceptical.  High scorers tend to be helpful, sympathetic, accommodating, tolerant and eager to please.

Arrogant - Receptive

This scale measures arrogance levels and how open someone is to feedback.  Being arrogant and not listening can have negative safety consequences.  Low scorers tend to be overly confident, may not listen well, and may be less willing to admit weaknesses.  High scorers tend to be open to feedback, more self-critical, and willing to admit they do not know everything.

Please email us if you would like to see a sample report.

In addition, Niche Consulting conducted a safety research project around utilising Whether people will abide by the rules or take risks is critical in safety roles psychological assessments to predict positive or negative safety attitudes in employees in NZ safety critical roles. 

Some of this research was presented by Neisha Voot from Niche Consulting at the Industrial & Organisational Conference in Adelaide in 2007.

The Niche Consulting research outcomes are in line with international research in this area.

The International Safety Research findings include:

  • Significant correlations between the negative safety behaviours and low Integrity Test scores
  • Significant correlations between the negative safety behaviours and low Conscientiousness on a personality assessment
  • Significant correlations between the negative safety behaviours and low Agreeableness on a personality assessment
  • Significant correlations between the negative safety behaviours and low Emotional Stability on a personality assessment

Read more about the research in this area...safety research 

Employ new recruits who are more likely to act safety:

Cartoon about safety

Of the many strategies an organisation can utilise to reduce workplace incident, accidents and near misses – one of the easiest to implement is to ensure the organisation selects new personnel who are predisposed to displaying a safety conscious attitude to work.

The research in this area shows that the utilisation of well designed and robust psychological assessment tools can predict safety outcomes.   By carefully screening and selecting safety critical personnel who are likely to act safely an organisation should have strong utility gains in the area of workplace safety. 

 

Niche Research Outcomes

Our research shows we can predict safety attitudes with psychometric assessment tools and this outcome proves transferability of the above international safety research findings to the NZ context.

We tested over 100 employees who were in safety critical roles, who completed both the a safety attitude survey and some psychometric assessments.  

The safety survey content was designed to measure attitudes about organisational and social factors that explained why individuals engage in unsafe work practices (Mullen, 2004). Read more...safety research

Integrity Test Results

International research has shown integrity tests are very good predictors of counterproductive work behaviours, including acting unsafely.

Integrity Test scores predicting safety perceptions

Niche Consulting's study found that employees with low integrity test scores were almost 3 TIMES more likely to have negative perceptions and attitudes about safety than those with High scores and almost 2 TIMES more likely than those with Average to High Scores.

Big 5 Personality Results

Conscientiousness

International research has shown those with high conscientiousness scores are less likely to act unsafely.

Conscentiousness predicting safety attitudes

Niche Consulting's study found that employees with low conscientious scores were almost 3 TIMES more likely to have negative perceptions and attitudes about safety than those with High scores and almost 2 TIMES more likely than those with Average to High Scores.

Agreeableness

International research has shown those with high agreeableness scores are less likely to act unsafely.

agreeableness and safety

Niche Consulting's study found that employees with low agreeableness test scores were almost 3 TIMES more likely to have negative perceptions and attitudes about safety than those with High scores and almost 2 TIMES more likely than those with Average to High Scores.

Emotional Stability

International research has shown those with high emotional stability scores are less likely to act unsafely.

emotional stability and safety

Niche Consulting's study found that employees with low emotional stability scores were almost 3 TIMES more likely to have negative perceptions and attitudes about safety than those with High scores and almost 2 TIMES more likely than those with Average to High Scores.Other types of assessments that might be used alongside personality assessments

We have other assessment tools in the following categories:

Research

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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